Car Wrecks

Uninsured Motorist Insurance and Personal Injury Claims

Kentucky & Indiana Car Accident Injury Lawyer

An individual who has been injured in an automobile accident may be able to seek monetary compensation for injuries and damages. Damages from a car wreck may include:

  • Medical treatment, both initial and long term
  • Vehicle and property damages
  • Lost wages and lost future earnings
  • Pain and suffering as a result of the accident and treatment
  • The loss of enjoyment of life
  • The loss of a loved one

 

So if you hire me, you hire an experienced injury lawyer, Jim Desmond. I can help you sort out just what your legal rigths are in regard to property damage claims, no-fault claims, ERISA claims and claims for pain and suffering.  As a personal injury lawyer, I am dedicated to helping people involved in auto wrecks and motorcycle wreck victims attain the maximum amount of compensation available. Unfortunately, that is all the law allows me to do; obtain money for the damages suffered by my personal injury client. However, what do you do when there is not any insurance or enough insurance to cover the damages you incurred from the car wreck? This is where uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage comes into play.  

UNINSURED MOTORIST COVERAGE

HAVE IT!

HAVE LOTS OF IT!

PRAY YOU NEVER HAVE TO USE IT!

THANK GOD WHEN YOU DO USE IT!

An uninsured motorist is someone who does not operates his vehicle without at least the state minimum in insurance coverage.  Uninsured Motorist coverage lets you make a personal injury claim against your own automobile insurance carrier for the injury damages caused by the at-fault driver if they were uninsured when the car wreck occurred. Let's put that in English. If the guy that hits you violates Kentucky and Indiana law by driving around without insurance, we can still recover on your personal injury claim. We just need to make that injury claim against your own car insurance and they then act like they insure the deadbeat that hit you.

So when I am evaluating a personal injury claim , I have to determine if the at-fault driver is truly uninsured.  A car can be legally insured through a variety of ways.  Automobiles can have liability insurance through the owner or the driver. If both the owner and driver of the vehicle are insured with different companies, usually the insurnace on the motor vehicle is primary and the insurance on the driver provides excess coverage should that first insurance policy be exhausted.  As a result, when I am looking for liability insurance so I can recover on my client's personal injury claim, I need to be sure that both the owner of the vehicle and the driver were uninsured and that they were also not covered through an employer’s insurance policy also.

For an uninsured motorist claim, your insurance company evaluates your personal injury claim just as they would the injury claim of a third-party, a person they do not insure.  They may or may not offer to settle your personal injury claim and they are not going to pay you a higher amount just because you their insured. However, whatever money they settle your personal injury claim for, they will sue the at-fault driver in an effort to recover.

Uninsured motorist coverage is so important because for a few hundred dollars a year, you have transferred the risk that the at-fault driver has no money and no assets to your own automobile insurance company.  Your insurance company can bear this risk a whole lot easier than we can.

I had a case wherein a father had just bought his son his first car, a Toyota from Jeff Wyler Toyota in Clarksville, Indiana.  Of course, the son was excited about his new car and immediately wanted to show all of his friends.  The son was on his way to Shively, Kentucky to visit his girlfriend when a Ford F150 truck pulled out of a gas station on Dixie Highway and hit the Toyota directly in the driver’s side door.  There was no question that the Ford truck was completely at fault, negligent in another words, for the automobile accident.  The son was obeying the speed limit, driving carefully and the driver of the F150 had a suspended license. 

The car wreck was serious and the son is taken from the accident scene by EMS to the Trauma Unit of University of Louisville Hospital.  After he arrived at the Trauma Unit, he find out his son would be fine but he did have a broken leg that would need to be repaired through surgery.  The police officer that investigated the car crash told the Father that the F150 driver was issued a citation for failing to have his vehicle properly insured.  

So I was dealing a car crash that occurred in Shively, Kentucky, an insurance policy that was issued in New Albany, Indiana and an uinsured driver from Clarksville, Indiana.  In other words, this single car crash involved laws from both Kentucky and Indiana and I had multiple jurisdictions that I could have filed a personal injury lawsuit in. The problem with a lawsuit is that when a jury issues a verdict and the Judge enters a Judgment against a Defendant, you still really only have a piece of paper saying someone owes you money. If that Defendant has no money to collect a Judgment from, it can be a worthless piece of paper that can be bankrupted.

It is against the law to driver without car insurance and such uninsured drivers face criminal charges for failing to do so. But criminal charges end with jail time and fines.  Personal injury claims involve recovering money for an injured person's medical expenses and pain and suffering. In other words, while the same car wreck may involve both a criminal citation and a personal injury claim, the end goal of either are not even close to being the same.

So how do you protect your family in the event of a serious car wreck or a catastrophic motorcycle accident? Uninsured Motorist Coverage purchased from your own automobile insurance carrier provides you and your family with a means of a recovering an injury claim for pain and suffering and medical expenses; this is true no matter whether you live in Jeffersonville, Indiana or Elizabethtown, Kentucky.  

Most Kentucky and Indiana automobile policies have uninsured motorist coverage but only in the amount of $25,000 per person. I recommend that people carry at least $100,000 per person of Uninsured Motorist Coverage on every car they own.  In both Kentucky and Indiana, the term “full coverage” has no legal significance.  My point being that perhaps your insurance agent sent you out with $25,000 of uninsured motorist coverage but, that is not enough!  If you have a serious automobile wreck,  chances are that your medical expenses alone will come close to, or exceed, that $25,000 in insurance coverage.

Further, I am not just talking about recovering on pain and suffering claim. Injury damages include lost wages; the co-pays and the deductibles from health insurance; physical scars from the car accident;  inability to perform daily activities while healing; the mental trauma from the car accident and; the cost of those items (crutches, etc.) that may not be covered by his health insurance. 

I understand that many people don’t care for injury attorneys, the legal system or believe in making claims for pain and suffering.  Nevertheless, this is not about those things.  This is about making sure your family is not left to the mercy of a flawed, legal system.  This is about making sure that you have the means of recovering all the damages allowed by law; whether you choose to do so through an attorney, on your own, or not at all.  This is about making sure your family’s financial goals are not through into ruin because someone else thought it was okay to drive a car in violation of the law.  

Further, Uninsured Motorist Coverage protects you in the case of a hit and run accident.  If the at-fault driver rear-ends your vehicle and then speeds off, you can make a claim for your pain and suffering through the uninsured motorist coverage on your own automobile insurance.  However, in the instance of a hit and run driver, the case law and/or the insurance policy generally requires that there be evidence of physical contact, direct or indirect, between the phantom vehicle and your car.